How to Be a Coach When You’re a Dad

11 Dec

Ronald Matsuura holds a DDS and practices dentistry at Los Gatos Dentist in California. Over the years, Dr. Matsuura has also served as a parent coach for many of his two sons’ athletic teams, including soccer, Little League baseball, and basketball. Here are his three tips to prospective parent coaches on how to make the experience good for everyone involved:

1. Be the coach, not the parent. When coaching your own child, the first impulse is often to go easy or go hard on him or her. However, by singling out the child in either way, you make it more difficult for your child to enjoy the game. When you are coaching, be the coach: train yourself to treat your child the same as you would treat any of the other children.

2. Be the parent, not the coach. After practice or a game is over, your child needs the unconditional love and support that only a parent can give. The coach inside of you might want to continue a discussion about your child’s form or footwork, but the only time for that is at practice and at games. Remember, the rest of the children you are coaching can come home from practice and be done with it. It is important to give your own child the same opportunity.

3. Know and love the game. Not every parent is cut out to be a coach. It is important that you understand the game before you volunteer your time. This often means doing some research and learning about the strategic elements and coaching strategies specific to the game. If you cannot take your role as a coach seriously, you will hinder the entire team.

By clearly separating your roles on and off the field, and dedicating some time and effort to being a good coach, you can provide a fun and fair experience for your own children as well as your whole team. Being a parent coach is its own reward, as long as it is done correctly.

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Why a Good Smile Is Worth It By Ron Matsuura, DDS

19 Nov

It’s common knowledge that a nice smile and healthy white teeth are valuable assets. Whether you are interviewing for a job or meeting a new romantic interest, feeling good about your teeth will help you project confidence.

A recent scientific study gives us further understanding of why having nice teeth is not just good for your health but can improve your life in other ways as well. British researchers at Central Lancashire and Leeds universities conducted a psychological experiment using digitally altered photographs of models, changing both the spacing and the color of the models’ teeth. Based on the results of viewer responses, they concluded that white, well-spaced teeth not only are considered more attractive, as we might expect, but also convey biological clues to potential mates.

Not unlike a peacock’s tail, a human’s healthy teeth are a sign of wellness and good genetic traits. Be sure you are projecting your best self with dental care and cosmetic solutions from Ron Matsuura, DDS.

The Importance of Microorganisms in Oral Health By Ron Matsuura, DDS

1 Nov

One of the biggest factors in determining one’s oral health is the system of microorganisms that live in the human mouth. As soon as a person is born, his or her oral microbiome starts to form, but this system is altered by the new bacteria that enter the mouth in both childhood and adulthood. How do these genetic and environmental factors interact, and how does this affect oral health?

Although there is a great deal of overlap in microbial species among all humans, a new study has shown that a person’s environment has a bigger impact on his or her mouth’s microbial setup than does his or her genetic makeup. By studying groups of twins, researchers found that genetic relatedness was less important than a common environment in determining the makeup of the mouth’s microorganisms.

This important finding serves to underscore what dentists have always told their patients: proper dental care has a determinative effect on oral health. While some people have the genetic odds in their favor, everyone should make good dental care a priority for their overall health. At the practice of Ron Matsuura, DDS, we have the tools to empower you to take control of your oral health.